Archive for the ‘security’ Category

IT Security for home users – keep your applications up to date

Friday, March 1st, 2019

Windows

ninite

My personal suggestion is ninite, to be found at https://ninite.com/

Select the applications you want to use, download the installer and run it only a daily basis – it will keep you up to date and safe(r)

MacOS

AppStore

Love it or hate it, but minor applications can easily be installed via the AppStore e.g. Line or Slack

Advantage: You will get an update notification from the AppStore if an update is available

Brew

Follow the instructions on the brew HP: https://brew.sh/

Once this is done, you can install, update or uninstall applications from the command line

Installs

brew install wget

brew cask install macvim

brew cask install gimp

brew cask install libreoffice

brew cask install quodlibet

brew cask install virtualbox

brew cask install chromium

brew cask install projectlibre

brew cask install vlc

brew cask install skype

brew cask install minikube

brew cask install firefox

brew cask install keepassx

brew cask install box-sync

Uninstall

brew cask uninstall <cask_name>

Upgrade

brew update && brew outdated && brew upgrade && brew cleanup

IT Security for home users – upgrade your OS

Thursday, February 28th, 2019

The mainstream operation systems (including mobile OSes) have an upgrade function (in case of a mobile OS, whether your carrier releases updates is a different story….)

Use that function and install those updates!

macOS: Go to the Apple icon, select “About This Mac” and click on “Software Update…” Most of the updates require a reboot, even on MacOS.

Windows: From the “Windows Settings”, go to “Update & Security”. Check for updates, install what’s available and reboot.

Ubuntu: Run ‘sudo apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade’
(if you feel like protesting because <your valid reason here>, then you already know what you’re doing and you shouldn’t be reading this anyway (unless you want to fact-check my ramblings))
Other Linux versions use different commands, if you’re unsure, google for the appropriate command on your platform.

IT security for home users – a simple guide (overview)

Tuesday, February 26th, 2019

I have been thinking about writing about this for a while… there is much information on staying secure out there and everything, I repeat, everything can already be read and practiced, even as a home user.

But maybe it bears repeating… so why not summarize some good practices here and maybe add my two cents.

Trying to stay secure as a home user usually comes down to just a couple of things:

  1. Upgrade your OS
  2. Disable what you don’t need
  3. Upgrade your application
  4. Change default passwords
  5. Upgrade anything else

Did I mention “upgrade <your stuff here>” already? You should do that.

If you fear breaking stuff by upgrading, then don’t upgrade *right away* – in IT, we say “avoid x.0 releases”. This applies to both OS and applications.
Wait for a x.1 or better x.2 release and install that one. Many vendors work hard to release good products but just as many release under time pressure and cut corners to make it in time, to save costs etc. It happens.

Keep coming back to read the details.